Cartoon Stuffing

wannabeanimator:

Straights Against Curves Tutorial | Toonboxstudio

hungrycrow:

some hexxit stuff with me and my friend

Combined all the movie posters for the heck of it just to see what it looks like, and I like what I’m seeing so far!

Disney’s BIG HERO 6 Movie Posters

Combined all the movie posters for the heck of it just to see what it looks like, and I like what I’m seeing so far!

Disney’s BIG HERO 6 Movie Posters

jtinelin:

My surreal family portrait! Final assignment for my acrylic class taught by the great @nathantota! Learned so much in this class :D I’ll post a better quality version on Tumblr soon! 11x14 in #acrylic on wood panel. #Painting #surreal #fantasyart #chihuahua #dogsofinstagram #drawingoftheday #illustration #artwork

jtinelin:

My surreal family portrait! Final assignment for my acrylic class taught by the great @nathantota! Learned so much in this class :D I’ll post a better quality version on Tumblr soon! 11x14 in #acrylic on wood panel. #Painting #surreal #fantasyart #chihuahua #dogsofinstagram #drawingoftheday #illustration #artwork

sketchinfun:

Fantastic resource for storyboarding! Gotta look over these myself too :)

wannabeanimator:

Dog and Butterfly | Wayne Unten

Inspired by a visit to the Tyrus Wong exhibit at the Walt Disney Family Museum in August 2013, this is an animation experiment using digital brushes to achieve a watercolor look. 

My Experience at Santa Monica College for Animations

I’m going to be graduating soon and I just would like to share my experience at SMC for any artists that’s interested in attending this community college because, well art schools are super expensive and no one wants to pay a debt that big for the rest of their lives. 

So I started going to SMC at 2008 not really sure what to do, I wanted to transfer to an art school like Otis, but midway I changed my mind and decided to try to graduate in animations. Back when I was taking animation classes in 2009, we used blue and red pencils along with light tables and paper specifically for animating. One of my favorite teachers at the school is Jim Keeshen. Jim teaches a ton of classes like story telling, storyboarding, visual development, and animation. Jim was the first teacher to really teach me how to animate. He has a sharp eye for animation but he is very critical. Don’t let him discourage you if he’s too critical. To me he was very motivational, even when he called my animations “sh*t” at times, nobody is perfect at animation. In some ways he help mold me into a better artist and when there’s something that needs to be changed, I do it.

The only class i felt was very disappointing was color theory. I had expectations to be enlightened and see colors in a new light. But the class was more focused using photoshop and copying paintings that were already painted. At some point we just worked on premier and most of the class had a hard time keeping up. The one class the redeemed itself to me wasn’t in the Entertainment campus, but the main campus. If you’re interested in learning colors and love painting, I would recommend the Acrylic class taught by one of my favorite teachers Nathan Ota. He’s a pop artist who’s specialty is acrylic media. You will not regret taking this class. It is really tough, but I learned so much from him, and i became really comfortable with colors. If you really want to do well in this class, I would suggest talking to Nathan Ota about techniques and such, he enjoys the company of inspired artists who asks him about art related things.

Personally I feel like I’m in between generations in animation at the moment. I learned a lot of traditional animation but now the school seems to be more focused about learning animation programs. So here is where I feel animation in this school has lost its touch. Sure there are great classes like the Maya class with Chris Fria that teaches the fundementals of 3D animation very well, but in terms of 2d animation it gets a bit complicating. Digital animations become a focus now in the school and we even got cintiqs now, which is awesome. However, with this, students are now more focused on learning programs like Flash and TV paint and it takes a lot of time to learn the program and the techniques. Just Last semester I took a 2d production class while barely grasping TV paint. Our group didn’t even complete the project because we didn’t really understand how we would combine the pieces, and some miscommunication. To be completely honest I didn’t really learn that much about TV paint, and it seems so exciting, but because the program is new to our school, we all had to force ourselves to get used to changes while worrying about the project being complete.

To be completely honest, I feel lucky to be able to learn animation on paper because we didn’t have to learn about a program and just go strait into the drawing process. We would watch old VHS tapes and watch our animations frame by frame, and it was really fun to see. But now that the schools entered a digital era, I feel the fundementals of animation are a bit faded. 

One last thing I would like to point out is that because Santa Monica College is a community college, you won’t always get lucky to be in a class with passionate artists, especially in group projects. I personally think there’s a better chance to be in a class with passionate artists in actual art schools. There are some artists here I feel are very talented and passionate like http://sketchinfun.tumblr.com that really motivated me to being better. But it seems because this is a community college, practically anyone can be in your class, as long as they paid. The only advice I can say about this is to be persistent and hungry for art, because the teachers are great and all, but overall you need to pull it together for yourself, and you might get noticed by one of your professors who can hook it up for you. One last thing I would like to say is, if you’re in a class and there are friends you just drive you nuts, its better not to burn bridges, because who knows where your friend may be in a few years from now. 

Thanks for reading and good luck :)

giancarlovolpe:

grizandnorm:

Tuesday Tips SUPER WEEK - Push it!Clarity is probably the most important thing to think about at all time when boarding. Pushing your poses to an undeniable level of clarity will improve the clarity of the storytelling in general. Don’t leave space for uncertainty in posing out your characters. Your audience will be more engaged and entertained by the sequence.This is the last post for the Super Week. I hope you enjoyed it. Back on the regular schedule next week (Every Tuesday).Norm

What a great series.  Thanks for posting these!

giancarlovolpe:

grizandnorm:

Tuesday Tips SUPER WEEK - Push it!

Clarity is probably the most important thing to think about at all time when boarding. Pushing your poses to an undeniable level of clarity will improve the clarity of the storytelling in general. Don’t leave space for uncertainty in posing out your characters. Your audience will be more engaged and entertained by the sequence.

This is the last post for the Super Week. I hope you enjoyed it. Back on the regular schedule next week (Every Tuesday).

Norm

What a great series.  Thanks for posting these!

grizandnorm:

Tuesday Tips - EYES!Eyes are what convey most of someone’s expression. Body language is important, but “eyes don’t lie”. There’s a reason why someone who’s lying will generally try to avoid eye contact. We are biologically set-up to “read” someone’s inner feelings by looking at their eyes.In storyboarding, if I’m in a real hurry to make a sequence “read” better, I will try to hit the eyes and facial expression as best as I can before anything else, especially if it’s an emotional scene.Have a great Tuesday, everyone!Norm

grizandnorm:

Tuesday Tips - EYES!

Eyes are what convey most of someone’s expression. Body language is important, but “eyes don’t lie”. There’s a reason why someone who’s lying will generally try to avoid eye contact. We are biologically set-up to “read” someone’s inner feelings by looking at their eyes.

In storyboarding, if I’m in a real hurry to make a sequence “read” better, I will try to hit the eyes and facial expression as best as I can before anything else, especially if it’s an emotional scene.

Have a great Tuesday, everyone!

Norm